image image image image image image

The India-ASEAN Delhi Dialogue is an annual international conference of political and economic leaders, officials, academics and opinion-makers of ASEAN countries with their Indian counterparts to discuss how to intensify and broaden political, strategic, economic and civil society interaction between the two regions.

Read More

 

 

The India-ASEAN Delhi Dialogue is an annual international conference of political and economic leaders, officials, academics and opinion-makers of ASEAN countries with their Indian counterparts to discuss how to intensify and broaden political, strategic, economic and civil society interaction between the two regions.

Read More

Click here to watch Recorded Webcast


Celebrating two decades of India-ASEAN cooperation, the theme for the Delhi-Dialogue IV is “India and ASEAN: Partners for Peace, Progress and Stability” which seeks to highlight India’s increasing engagement with ASEAN

Read More

The third in the series, the Delhi Dialogue III was hosted by India’s Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) in partnership with the Indian Council of World Affairs (ICWA) and FICCI, together with the support of ISEAS,

Read More

Continuing along the same line, the Delhi Dialogue II, held on 21-22 January, 2010 saw the focus on regional security and cooperation with the theme of examining

Read More

Intended as an annual second track conference focusing on India- ASEAN Regional security and cooperation, the Delhi Dialogue I was inaugurated by H E Shri Pranab Mukherjee, the then

Read More

  • Delhi Dialogue VI
  • Delhi Dialogue V
  • Delhi Dialogue IV
  • Delhi Dialogue III
  • Delhi Dialogue II
  • Delhi Dialogue I

Concept Note - Delhi Dialogue V

Plenary Session 1: India-ASEAN Security Cooperation: Towards Peace and Stability

  1. The shifting of the US pivot towards the Asia-Pacific region is a major geo-political and geo-strategic development that is shaping the regional security environment.
  2. The growing Chinese assertiveness coupled with its military strength, especially its naval power projection capabilities, has set off varied reaction among its neighbours in East and Southeast Asia.
  3. The maritime boundary disputes between China and a number of South-East Asian countries have given rise to conflicts over living and non-living resources, particularly oil and natural gas deposits in the South China Sea region.
  4. The safety and security of shipping lanes in the South China Sea has further vitiated the security environment in the region.

Concurrent Session 2A: Non-Traditional Security Challenges: Food Security, Water Management and Pandemics

  1. The number of people living below poverty line is still high and ‘poverty reduction’ is a key mission relevant to any regional co-operation and integration. The gaps in food availability could potentially turn into ‘critical points of crisis’, which would be counterproductive to both India and ASEAN.
  2. Water is a critical resource and its management has been a subject of debate and discussion. The water issues emerge in the form of damming of river, water sharing, management of water for agriculture and availability of clean drinking water.
  3. Pandemics and disease are no longer limited to national boundaries and have assumed a trans-national dimension. SARS and H1N1 virus have in recent times afflicted the region and merit concerted policy initiatives.

Concurrent Session 2B: Future of Global Energy Market: Role of New and Renewable Energy in Sustainable Development

  1. India’s economic growth is highly dependent on sustained supply of energy resources. ASEAN countries, particularly Myanmar, Vietnam and Malaysia can potentially contribute to India’s energy security.
  2. India and several ASEAN countries are net importers of hydrocarbon and it is important to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. The need to develop alternative energy sources in the region has been gathering momentum.
  3. The renewable energy resources are technology intensive and require significant finance. Therefore regional cooperation to develop alternative sources of energy is an important imperative.

Plenary Session 3: Cooperation between CLMV Countries and North-East India: Opportunities and Challenges

  1. The natural resource potential of Northeast India and CLMV countries offers opportunities for developing an export-oriented economy. It also serves as a tool for encouraging investment and industrial development in the region.
  2. Initiatives such as the Mekong Ganga Cooperation (MGC) would enhance connectivity between Northeast India and CLMV countries resulting in socio-economic development and also encourage people to people contacts.
  3. Myanmar’s geographic location serves as a land bridge for India to engage with ASEAN and is an important node in India’s Look East Policy.

Plenary Session 4: Expanding Networks through Connectivity: Land, Sea and Air

  1. Since ancient times, India and Southeast Asia have enjoyed the benefits of connectivity and the traditional trade relations need to be augmented further to meet the demands of a globalized world.
  2. India and ASEAN need to focus on cooperation in enhancing connectivity through land, sea and air.
  3. This can be synergised through joint development of infrastructure such as transport networks, ports, shipping and air connectivity for greater regional economic integration.
New

Why Attend the Conference

Meet the 'Who's Who' of the identified sectors from India & ASEAN region.

Reports

Images from Gallery

Bottom Image